Online Collections

Search Tips

Quotation Marks—Enclosing a multiword phrase in quotation marks tells the search engine to list only sites that contain those words in that exact order.

The following must appear in ALL CAPS and with a space on each side.

AND—Indicates that the records found must contain all the words joined by the AND operator. For example, to find objects that contain the words wizard, oz, and movie, enter wizard AND oz AND movie.

OR—Records found must contain at least one of the words joined by OR. For example, to find objects that contain the word dog or the word puppy, enter dog OR puppy.

AND NOT—Indicates that the records found cannot contain the word that follows the term AND NOT. For example, to find objects that contain the word pets but not the word dogs, enter pets AND NOT dogs.

Skip-a-cross

board game

Out of work architect Alfred M. Butts invented the game we know as Scrabble in the later 1930s. It wasn't until 1948 that he sold most of the rights to a partner, James Brunot. Brunot manufactured the game and gave Butts a small percentage of every unit sold. And Brunot renamed the game "Scrabble" and tweaked the rules just a bit. Still, the game foundered in sales. According to popular legend, it wasn't until 1952, when Jack Straus, president of Macy's, played the game on vacation and subsequently placed an order, that the game began to sell in numbers. By 1953 and 1954, Brunot couldn't keep store shelves stocked. Scrabble was everywhere! At that time, in order to meet demant, Brunot allowed Selchow & Righter to produce the game. And still demand outraced supply. Selchow subsequently licensed Cadaco-Ellis to make a similar game, in 1954, to help meet demand. That game, Skip-a-cross, utilized cheaper materials--cardboard letters and letter racks--but it played exactly the same as Scrabble.

ManufacturerCadaco
Materialprinted paper | printed cardboard
OriginUSA
LicenserSelchow & Righter Co.
Styleword
Object ID114.6056
Credit LineGift of Dr. Anthony and Cornelia Labrum

All artifact images, interpretive information, and website text
© The Strong.